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Reconciling Wizards' Conclave and Towers of High Sorcery

by Trampas Whiteman


The novel Wizards' Conclave and the gaming supplement Towers of High Sorcery present different takes on how wizards view sorcerers. The novel Wizards' Conclave makes it pretty clear that wizards consider sorcerers to be "blasphemers", and that the magic of sorcery is dangerous.

Towers of High Sorcery has a slightly different outlook, which I'm assuming comes into effect after the events in Wizards' Conclave. According to Towers of High Sorcery, each order has a different view of sorcerers.

  • Black Robes are to study sorcerers in order to gain what power they can, then destroy them when they are of no more use.
  • White Robes are to try to persuade sorcerers to become wizards and join the Orders. If they can't, they are to keep a watchful eye on them, interceding only if sorcerers become a danger.
  • Red Robes are the odd duck out, as Lunitari is fascinated with sorcery. They are the ones who are to study this new magic and learn what they can.

The Orders are agreed that sorcerers are forbidden to gather into a group. If they do so, then there will be conflict. The Thorn Knights would be a prime target.

I think the events in Wizards' Conclave stem from initial reactions from the gods, and are the events that lead up to the Conclave's decision on magic, as seen in Towers of High Sorcery. I can picture a scene in my head where they Conclave is gathered to discuss how they will approach wild magic, after the attack by Kalrakin and Luthor.

So here we have this debate, and Dalamar is being, well...., Dalamar. He's giving this huge speech on the evils of Wild Sorcery. Jenna is sitting there contemplating matters.

Suddenly, Coryn gets up, and says, "Enough!" She goes into an oratory of her own, chastising Dalamar for his reaction, and mentioning how some wizards were hypocrites. She reminds them that Wild Sorcery is what saved them, and goes into a long, detailed history of the benefits of Wild Sorcery in the Age of Mortals.

Jenna then gets up, commends both Dalamar and Coryn for their speeches, and then asks each of them to look into their heart, to seek the will of the gods they worship. As the debate goes on, a decision is made on how to approach things.

Dalamar discusses events with his fellow Black Robes, and comes to the conclusion that sorcerers will be studied, but only to further the power of the Black Robes. Nuitari is pleased.

While Coryn is the champion of Wild Sorcery, she speaks with her fellow White Robes, and the consensus is that sorcerers will be invited into the Wizards of High Sorcery as wizards, and those who don't join will be watched to make sure that they don't become dangerous.

Jenna surprises everyone with the decision that the Red Robes are to study sorcerers for the betterment of magic. Dalamar and Coryn are stunned by this, but Jenna reminds them that the Balance should also apply between wizards and sorcerers, and that the purpose of the Wizards of High Sorcery is to do what they can for the betterment of magic. Jenna secretly feels ashamed for her actions in Wizards' Conclave.

That's my take on events, and serves as the resolution between the two. I like the anti-sorcerer bias, but I think it makes things more interesting still to temper that with the edicts of the Orders of High Sorcery.

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